Why learn German in German Language School?

If every language is closely linked to a country, German is one example that shares its code of communication with numerous countries: nearly 100 million people worldwide speak German. Whether you go to Austria, to German-speaking Switzerland, Luxemburg or even certain parts of Belgium, northern Italy or eastern France, you can put into practice the knowledge acquired by learning this interesting Language. Learning German will therefore open up a range of new cultures to you.

Good reasons for learning German:

* German is the most spoken language within the European Union; one European in four speaks German.

* After English, German is the language in which the most information is available on the Internet.

* German tourists, who earn more in international comparisons, are more and more numerous. In travel as well as in business, German is a major asset.

* The importance of German is likely to increase as Germany invests more than any other country in research and development.

* Communication: German is spoken by more than 120 million people in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Switzerland, and in parts of Belgium, Northern Italy and Eastern France.

* Business: German is a key language in the European Union and the new economies of Central and Eastern Europe. Learning German improves your chances of success on the job market.

* Culture: German is one of the most important cultural languages. It was spoken and written by Goethe, Mozart, Beethoven, Freud, Klimt and Einstein, and numerous other great artists and scientists.


Germany is the greatest economic power in Europe and occupies third place on a global scale. German is by consequence a real asset in the professional world and represents, for numerous employers, an essential skill. Mastering this language could prove to be a precious work tool. What’s more, you need only look at job ads to notice that linguistic skills constitute more and more often an essential criterion for selecting candidates. Learning German will therefore increase your chances of professional success.

Germany is a member state of the European Union and part of its single market.

For your studies

German encompasses great cultural richness. This language is taught in most countries and is sometimes even compulsory, notably in Switzerland. A large proportion of literary works, scientific publications and reference works are available uniquely in the German language. Learning German will therefore increase your chances of scholastic success and begin your discovery of one of the great cultures of Europe.

About Germany’s Economy

Germany is the largest national economy in Europe, the third largest by nominal GDP in the world. Since the age of industrialization the country has been a driver, innovator and beneficiary of an ever more globalized economy. Most of the country's products are in engineering, especially in automobiles, machinery, metals, and chemical goods. Germany is the leading producer of wind turbines and solar power technology in the world. The largest, annual, international trade fairs and congresses are held in several German cities such as Hanover, Frankfurt and Berlin.

Frankfurt is a major financial centre, seat of the European Central Bank and a global aviation hub.


Germany uses the common European currency, the euro, and its monetary policy is set by the European Central Bank in Frankfurt. After the German reunification in 1990, the standard of living and annual income remains significantly higher in the former West German states.[77] The modernization and integration of the eastern German economy continues to be a long-term process scheduled to last until the year 2019, with annual transfers from west to east amounting to roughly $80 billion.


Germany – short History

A region named Germania inhabited by several Germanic peoples has been known and documented before 100 AD. Beginning in the 10th century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman Empire that lasted until 1806. During the 16th century, northern Germany became the centre of the Protestant Reformation. As a modern nation-state, the country was first unified amidst the Franco-Prussian War in 1871. In 1949, after World War II, Germany was divided into two separate states—East Germany and West Germany—along the lines of Allied occupation. The two states were unified in 1990. West Germany was a founding member of the European Community (EC) in 1957, which became the European Union in 1993. It is part of the borderless Schengen zone and adopted the European currency, the euro, in 1999.

Martin Luther, (1483–1546) initiated the Protestant Reformation.

The Protestant Reformation

The monk Martin Luther publicized his 95 Theses in 1517, challenging practices of the Roman Catholic Church, initiating the Protestant Reformation. A separate Lutheran church became the official religion in many German states after 1530. Religious conflict led to the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648), which devastated German lands. The population of the German states was reduced by about 30%. The Peace of Westphalia (1648) ended religious warfare among the German states, but the empire was de facto divided into numerous independent principalities. From 1740 onwards, the dualism between the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy and the Kingdom of Prussia dominated German history. In 1806, the Imperium was overrun and dissolved as a result of the Napoleonic Wars.


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